Elder Gods of the Blood-Soaked Field

Dieties of winter, embodying the withering of all life in the season of desiccation, freely roam the open plain in behemoth aspect.

Colloquially known as nut-cracker, a god of devouring stalks the land, consuming and destroying crops of the fall harvest.

Accompanying this terrible being is the “man of snow” a rotund figure whose jovial nature hides the fact that his form conceals a bleached human skeleton. Originally a ritual practice of obscure sub-arctic cannibal tribes, the “man of snow” somehow detached from its original semiotic context and descended to dwell in the warmth of Christian holiday. read more

Local God of Central Oregon

The unnamed beaver: a dark earth god. A deity of trickery and severance.


It is a force of destruction that dwells in the water. Native American worshippers centuries ago understood its power to craft symmetry and to sever it. This basic aspect has been lost to modern worshippers, and thus the beaver god’s power diminishes even as its influence spreads.

The curious sailor’s cap is a misattribution of the beaver god’s power over water, especially in the sense of creating a reflective duality, a line of mirror symmetry, within an existing magical system. The ancient power may also be invoked to sever lines of symmetry in magical constructions. Often asymmetrical arrangements can prove more dynamic, if more volatile, than symmetrical geometry. It all depends on the application, as Morgan’s lux arcana shows in its symmetrical and asymmetrical patterns. read more